Peru | Hotels | Restaurants  | Cusco Tours | Inti Raymi 2015 | Machu Picchu | Inca Trail Peru | Nazca Lines
Titicaca Tours | Lima Tours | Huaraz Tours | Rainforest Tours | The North Tours | Cajamarca Tours | Comprehensive Tours
Departments / Districts
   The Coast
   La Sierra
   La Selva
Contact Us
Version Español

Lake Titicaca

Lake Titicaca is the highest commercially navigable lake in the world, at 3,812 m (12,536 feet) above sea level. It is also South America's largest freshwater lake, with a surface area of approximately 8372 square kilometres.

Located in the Altiplano high in the Andes on the border of Peru and Bolivia, at 16°S 69°W, Titicaca has an average depth of between 107 m, and a maximum depth of 281 m. The western part of the lake belongs to the Puno Region of Peru, and the eastern side is located in the Bolivian La Paz Department.

More than 25 rivers empty into Titicaca, and the lake has 41 islands, some of which are densely populated.

Titicaca is fed by rainfall and meltwater from glaciers on the sierras that abut the Altiplano. It is drained by the Desaguadero River, which flows south through Bolivia to Lake Poopo. This accounts for less than five per cent of the lake's water loss, however, the rest being accounted by evaporation as a result of strong winds and sunlight at this altitude.



Titicaca is notable for a population of people who live on the Uros, a group of about 40 artificial islands made of floating reeds. These islands have become a major tourist attraction for Peru, drawing excursions from the lakeside city of Puno.


The people of Taquile, off the coast from Puno, are known for their fine handwoven textile products, among the highest quality in Peru. The island attracts many tourists each year.


Amantani is another small island in Lake Titicaca populated by Quechua speakers. About 800 families live in six villages on the basically circular 15-square kilometer island. There are two mountain peaks, called Pachatata (Father Earth) and Pachamama (Mother Earth), and ancient ruins on the top of both peaks. The hillsides that rise up from the lake are terraced and planted with wheat, potatoes, and vegetables. Most of the small fields are worked by hand. Long stone fences divide the fields, and cattle, sheep, and alpacas graze on the hillsides.

There are no cars on the island, and no hotels. A few small stores sell basic goods, and there is a health clinic and school. Electricity is produced by a generator and limited to a couple of hours each day.

Some of the families on Amantani offer a meal or overnight stay to tourists, arranged through tour guides. Guests typically take food staples (cooking oil, rice, sugar) as a gift.



Mon-Fri 9 Am - 6 Pm ET
please allow pop-ups


Call Centers

North America
Monday - Friday
From 9 am to 6 pm ET

1 888 671 2852 voice
1 888 671 2853 voice

Discounted Airfares
Toll Free

1 482 247 4242 Fax 

UK customers Call
Toll Free (Freephone)

0 800 098 8450

Australia Toll Free

Rest of the world call
+51 1 4443027 - 4457704


Copyright © 2000-2015, All rights reserved